A Commonwealth Crisis

“Let’s Talk”

“TALK TO YOUR STATE SENATOR”

STATEWIDE VIDEO COMPETITION

Sponsored by the Senate of Pennsylvania with support from the members of
the Drug and Alcohol Service Providers Organization of Pennsylvania

Enter the Video Competition

Drug Addiction has taken hold in every corner of our state, within every racial segment of society, and on every socio-economic level. Gone are the days of a stereotypical drug addict; today, they come from all walks of life, they are your doctors, your parents, your classmates, and yes, maybe even you.

ACommonwealthCrisis.com, was created as a tool to assist Pennsylvanians. Experts agree, the best way to confront this crisis is to bring it out from behind closed doors and talk about it, so we can address it together.  Although it receives a lot of attention, heroin isn’t the only drug impacting society.

As a student in Pennsylvania’s schools, you face the pressures of being a teen in the 21st Century. You are an expert. Legislators often turn to experts to advise them on policy issues when creating new laws. Share your thoughts; advise your legislator – talk to us!  Tell us how you think we can prevent students from becoming involved in drugs. Help us create policies that work!

Our goal is to prevent drug use and addiction.  Therefore, your original VIDEO entry must address the issue of preventing teens from starting drugs–legal and illegal–including alcohol.

The Members of the Drug and Alcohol Service Providers Organization of Pennsylvania are providing $10,000 in prize money. Money will be awarded through the TAP 529 Account program in the PA Department of Treasury and will be deposited into an account in the winner(s) name.

Official rules and entry information are available here.

Deadline for entry is December 10, 2017.

Pennsylvania’s Sobering Statistics:

  • 4,642 – the number of Overdose Deaths in PA during 2016 (DEA). Opioids caused 85% of those deaths.
  • In PA, more adults age 20 to 44 are dying from drug overdoses than motor vehicle accidents.
  • White males make up 74% of the reported overdose deaths.
  • 80% of heroin abusers reported abusing prescription opioids before abusing heroin.